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SEAALL Annual Meeting 2019

March 21-23, 2019

Preliminary Program 

 

Saturday March 23, 2019

8:00 AM - 9:30 AM Breakfast, Business meeting, and Keynote speaker

Keynote speaker

John Mayer, Executive Director of CALI

John has been the Executive Director of the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction aka CALI since 1994. CALI is a non-profit consortium of almost all US law schools that works at the intersection of legal education, legal technology and access to justice. CALI publishes over 1000 web-based tutorials that teach the law. All are written by law faculty or law librarians and are assigned by law faculty or used by students for self-study. CALI publishes casebooks under an innovative model. They pay authors to write the books and distribute them - for free - under a Creative Commons license in multiple ebook formats including PDF, epub/Ipad, mobi/Kindle and Microsoft Word. This gives faculty and students maximum permissions and freedom to edit and repurpose the material for their educational needs. CALI is also the developer of A2J Author which is used by law schools, legal aid and courts to automate over 1000 court forms. A2J Author has helped over 5 million people in the last decade. The software is an expert system authoring system used by attorneys, court staff - and by law schools as a teaching tool.

John has a BS in Computer Science from Northwestern University and a Masters of Science in Computer Science from the Illinois Institute of Technology. He can be reached at jmayer@cali.org or followed on Twitter @johnpmayer.

9:45 AM - 10:45 AM Session F

F1: Agile, Lean, and Design: OH MY! (Deep Dive Part 1) (Chesapeake)

Design thinking has become a buzz phrase with many people claiming to employ it that are not. This program will cover several models of design philosophy and how to apply them in the law library setting to develop new programs/services to modifying workflows to improve efficiency. Properly executed design methodology can create a more inclusive development process, increasing input from your often more silent counterparts. This session will prepare you for when a Dean, Partner, or another individual up the chain inevitably says, "Figure out this Design Think thing I keep hearing about and how we can apply it." In part 1 of this deep dive will explain design methodology. In part 2, you will put what you learned into practice through a design thinking exercise.

Casandra Laskowski, Duke University School of Law
George Taoultsides, Harvard Law School

F2: How do you Solve a Problem Like Old Media? (Lexington)

Law libraries often have materials in different formats. Some formats, like VHS tape and audiocassette, are deteriorating to the point of needing attention now if the content needs to be retained. We will talk about how Collection Services, Acquisitions, and Media partnered to replace or convert these older materials before the originals were unsalvageable. We'll talk about copyright issues, materials required for conversion, and problems we encountered during the process.

Rachel Gordon, Duke University School of Law
Miguel Bordo, Duke University School of Law

F3: From JD to JM: Constructing a Course for a New Law Degree (Stratford)

Many law schools are implementing new programs targeted at individuals not seeking a juris doctorate. At Florida State University, we recently created a new Juris Masters degree for established professionals who needed a deeper understanding of the law for their careers. This program will focus on the development and unique challenges presented for the librarians in designing introductory online instruction. Reflecting on multiple years of student evaluations and administrative feedback, this program will explore the evolution of course content based upon format, successful program growth, and changing student needs.

Katie Crandall, Florida State University College of Law
Amy Lipford, Florida State University College of Law

F4: Encouraging the Librarian Author with Workshops (Mt. Vernon)

Recent surveys of AALL members demonstrate a high interest in scholarship especially among academic law librarians. But surveys also show that structural supports are missing. Workshops, common among law faculty, can nurture librarian authors in developing strong scholarship and can foster an institutional culture emphasizing the importance of scholarship to the profession. The Kathrine R. Everett Law Library at the University of North at Chapel Hill has launched a workshop series to meet this need. This program will describe our progress so far and offer information and tips for librarians interested in developing programs at their own libraries.

Anne Klinefelter, UNC School of Law
Aaron S. Kirschenfeld, UNC School of Law
Nicole Downing, UNC School of Law

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Session G

G1: Agile, Lean, and Design: OH MY! (Deep Dive Part 2) (Chesapeake)

Design thinking has become a buzz phrase with many people claiming to employ it that are not. This program will cover several models of design philosophy and how to apply them in the law library setting to develop new programs/services to modifying workflows to improve efficiency. Properly executed design methodology can create a more inclusive development process, increasing input from your often more silent counterparts. This session will prepare you for when a Dean, Partner, or another individual up the chain inevitably says, "Figure out this Design Think thing I keep hearing about and how we can apply it." In part 1 of this deep dive will explain design methodology. In part 2, you will put what you learned into practice through a design thinking exercise.

Casandra Laskowski, Duke University School of Law
George Taoultsides, Harvard Law School

G2: Data Visualization: Tips & Tricks

Data visualization has quickly become a fixture in daily life, from presentations of charts and graphs by media organizations to presentations of data analytics and case relationships by legal database providers. This program will walk participants through the four conceptualizations of data presentation, as well as an exploration on using data visualization to persuade your audience. We will present law library examples for each concept, using free and low cost data visualization tools.

Carol Watson, University of Georgia School of Law
Amy Taylor, University of Georgia School of Law

G3: Critical Reading for Law Students -- What Library, LRW, and ASP Can Collectively Do To Help Hone This Indispensable Skill (Stratford)

There is continued confusion about why many law students struggle –both in law school and on the bar exam. One of the most important skills, and possibly lowest hanging fruit, is the ability to critically read. Critical reading may be one of the easiest skills to train yet it is too often overlooked. This program will develop concrete tools and suggestions for how various law school departments including the library, LRW, ASP, and doctrinal faculty can break through silos to collaboratively focus on improving the critical reading skills of law students.

Vicenç Feliú, Nova Southeastern University College of Law
Sara Berman, AccessLex Institute Center for Legal Education Excellence

G4: The Hybrid Law Library Orientation: Video Creation, Face-to-Face Reconfiguration and Comparative Assessment (Mt. Vernon)

In Fall 2018 UGA Law Library changed the orientation process for incoming students. The 3-pronged approach (1) updated a libguide which served as home-base for the online orientation experience, (2) created a brand new video to deliver basic information to 1Ls in the form of a virtual tour, and (3) introduced a one-day outreach which included a resource fair, librarian meet-and-greet, and in-person library tours event to re-enforce the guide and video content. This program will share the reasons why we designed orientation this way, how we did it and assessed impact, and what our results were.

Rachel Evans, University of Georgia School of Law