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SEAALL Annual Meeting 2019

March 21-23, 2019

Preliminary Program 

 

Friday March 22, 2019

8:00 AM - 10:00 AM Breakfast, Welcome message, AALL Executive board update and Keynote speaker

Welcome from Dean Gregory Bowman

Gregory Bowman, William J. Maier, Jr. Dean of the WVU College of Law

Gregory W. Bowman was appointed the William J. Maier, Jr. Dean of the WVU College of Law effective May 1, 2015. Before being named Interim Dean in July 2014, he served as the College's Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. A nationally recognized scholar in international trade law and remedies, he joined the faculty in 2009.

Bowman is a native of West Virginia and a graduate of WVU (B.A., International Studies & Economics, summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa). He also studied in Denmark as a Rotary Exchange Student and received his master’s degree in Economics (with distinction) from the University of Exeter, England, before receiving his J.D. cum laude from the Northwestern University School of Law.

Bowman received the Award for Outstanding Teaching from the WVU Foundation in 2014, and he was named “Professor of the Year” in 2011 by WVU Law students. He is the founding director of the College of Law’s Geneva Study Abroad Program.

Prior to his teaching career, Bowman practiced law in Chicago and Washington, D.C. with the international law firm of Baker McKenzie.

AALL Executive board update

Femi Cadmus, AALL President

Femi Cadmus is the Archibald C. and Frances Fulk Rufty Research Professor of Law, Associate Dean of Information Services and Technology, and Director of the Michael J. Goodson Library. Her almost three decades professional career in law libraries spans both academic and law firm libraries where she has taught legal research and analysis, and law practice technology to law students and attorneys.

Cadmus comes to Duke Law from Cornell University where she was Edward Cornell Law Librarian, Associate Dean for Library Services and Professor of the Practice from 2011-2018. Her previous professional experience also includes positions at the Law Schools at Yale, George Mason University and the University of Oklahoma.

Cadmus is active in regional and national library associations including the American Association of Law Libraries in which she is currently president. She also serves on the advisory boards of LawArXiv, The Global Online Access to Legal Information (GOALI) and LLMC Digital. Her research focus, publications and presentations cover topics such as law and technology, the evolving role of the modern day law library, open access to legal information, and law library management and administration.

Cadmus’ educational background includes an LL.B. from the University of Jos, Nigeria, B.L Nigerian Law School, LL.M. (Law in Development), University of Warwick, England, and M.L.I.S. from the University of Oklahoma. She is admitted to practice in New York.

Keynote Speaker

Dan Kimble, Director, West Virginia Access to Justice Commission

As director of the Access to Justice Commission at West Virginia University School of Law, Kimble works to increase funding for West Virginia’s legal aid organizations and to support projects that will improve residents’ access to legal resources and pro bono services.

Kimble was President/CEO of the Morgantown Area Chamber of Commerce from 2013-16. Prior to that, he served as chief counsel to the Speaker of the West Virginia House of Delegates from 2007-13, and as chief counsel to the West Virginia Secretary of State from 2004-07.

He earned his J.D. from WVU Law in 1999 and his Executive MBA from WVU in 2012. He also holds a bachelor's degree in religion from West Virginia Wesleyan College (1982), a Masters in Divinity, and a Doctorate in Ministry from United Theological Seminary in Dayton, Ohio. 

Kimble is an associate pastor at Bridgeport United Methodist Church in Bridgeport, West Virginia.

 

10:15 AM - 11:00 AM Session A

A1: Partnership Opportunities to Enhance Access to Justice (Chesapeake)

The Access to Justice gap is real, and it provides real opportunities for librarians and law schools to enhance democracy, enable empowerment to underserved populations, and provide students with transformative experiences in understanding new ways to deliver legal services. This program explores examples of how law schools support access to justice initiatives, emphasizing the partnership and leadership opportunities for libraries. Panelists will discuss existing and potential justice initiatives, including the George R. Farmer Jr. Law Library’s support of the Appalachian Justice Initiative (AJI) at the West Virginia University College of Law, the University of Richmond involvement in efforts of the state Access to Justice Commission, and . Providing robust support to access to justice initiatives constitutes an invaluable, democracy-enhancing institutional role for law libraries.

Nicholas F. Stump, West Virginia University College of Law
Roger Skalbeck, University of Richmond School of Law
Gail Warren, Virginia State Law Librarian

A2: Telling the Library's Story with Data (Lexington)

Law libraries collect a lot of data. We gather statistics for reporting agencies, we gather information through the strategic planning process, or we survey our users regularly. This program will covers ways to use that data to communicate the library's value to non-librarians. This program will cover techniques on how to use the data, such as in annual reports and newsletters, and techniques to create visuals, such as selecting the appropriate infographic to tell your story effectively.

Michelle Cosby, University of Tennessee College of Law
Whitney Curtis, Barry University School of Law
Faye Jones, University of Illinois College of Law
Megan Mall, AALL
Shira Megerman, Boston University School of Law

A3: This is your Brain on Research: Cognitive Theory and Assignment Construction (Stratford)

Are there better ways to craft legal research assignments? This panel discussion will review current cognitive theory (spaced & varied repetition, scaffolding, etc.) and discuss how it can facilitate challenging, fair, and informative legal research assignments. We work with students that have a variety of skill levels and backgrounds. It is critical that we are engaging each member of our classroom in an intentional manner.

Franklin Runge, Washington and Lee University School of Law
Jennifer Mart-Rice, Washington and Lee University School of Law
Alyson Drake, Texas Tech University School of Law

A4: Teddy Talks (Mt. Vernon) 

Integrating Legal Tech throughout the Curriculum

Many of our graduates at NCCU Law work in small law firms or public services positions that do not have IT or administrative staff support. To prepare our students for practice, we have sought to introduce students to the law practice technology tools that will make them more efficient, saving them time and money. To expose more students to these tools, we have gone outside of our Law Practice Technology class to integrate the Procertas Legal Technology Assessment into several upper level writing and clinical courses. This Teddy Talk will explain why we chose Procertas as the tool to focus on first, how we went about integrating Procertas into these courses, the bumps we have faced along the way, and how we hope to move forward integrating other tech tools throughout the curriculum.

Austin Williams, North Carolina Central University School of Law

Quit the Juggling Act and Live Your Best Life! Work-Life Integration for Law Librarians 

Stressed? Law librarians in firms, academia, and courts often face the unending battle of proving our value as professionals. In doing so, professional duties for many librarians have expanded, in a relatively short period, to include handling more client research matters, filling gaps in course offerings, and increasing participation on committees. For many librarians, expanded duties spill over into time previously dedicated to family, friends, exercise, or other personal duties. With increasing work demands and more personal-life responsibilities, so-called balance falls by the wayside. Several tips and tools will be examined to help you achieve a better quality of life.

Richelle Reid, Emory University School of Law

Hot Coffee and Hot Topics: Barrister Breaks at the Charleston School of Law 

During my first year as a faculty liaison librarian, my director and I created an informal conversation series highlighting the research passions of faculty, staff, and alumni. Barrister Breaks create a small group format to allow non-library stakeholders to share, discuss, and explore their interests with students in a relaxed environment. This low-stress opportunity to discuss hot topics in a stand-alone library space brings in participants who may not otherwise come to the library. Join me as I discuss what we did wrong and right from implementation to recruitment and assessment, while engaging stakeholders with our Barrister Breaks series.

Deborah Turkewitz, Charleston School of Law

11:00 AM - 11:15 AM Break (Crystal)

11:15 AM - 12:00 PM Session B

B1: Cornerstones of Democracy: Threats to Voting Rights, Innovations to Restore Fair Elections, and How Librarians Can Act to Strengthen American Democracy (Chesapeake)

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden has described libraries as “a cornerstone of democracy.” Currently, voting rights are under threat across the country but also visibly in states comprising the SEAALL region. As cornerstones of democracy, what non-partisan actions should librarians take to strengthen democracy? Participants in this program will learn of the specific threats to voting rights in our region, the non-partisan solutions available to alleviate the threats to voting rights, and the simple professional actions that librarians can take to help the solutions take hold in public consciousness.

Beau Steenken, University of Kentucky College of Law
Sarah Lewis, University of Florida College of Law
Joshua A. Douglas, University of Kentucky College of Law

B2: How to Solve a Problem like Replacing the Acquisitions Librarian (Lexington)

It has finally happened. Your acquisitions librarian of many years has (very happily) retired. However, finding a replacement does not turn out to be as easy as you first thought. Like Maria in the Sound of Music, the acquisitions librarian brings a certain quality to the law library that is as unmistakable as it is elusive to replicate. This program will explore the various dimensions of the role of the acquisitions librarian in today's law library. Panelists will discuss approaches to the acquisitions position such as the traditional role rooted in library technical services, as well as perspectives in emerging technologies, faculty services, and institutional repositories.

Yolanda Jones, FAMU College of Law
Linda Sobey, FAMU College of Law
Dawn Smith, Yale Law School
Billie Jo Kaufman, American University Washington College of Law

B3: Create, Innovate and Act – When 1L Year Isn’t Enough to Master Legal Research: Remapping Your ALR Course(s) (Stratford)

Is your Advanced Legal Research course turning into a Remedial Legal Research course as ours was? Has it become apparent that your rising 2Ls aren’t fully grasping the basics of legal research during their first year either? In January 2018, the law librarians at Emory Law decided enough was enough and set out to create an entirely new way to teach advanced legal research to our upper level students. In Fall 2018, we launched our Mastery ALR Course Series -- an entirely redesigned ALR curriculum consisting of four “mastery” legal research courses (intended to replace our existing ARL course) and open to all of our upper-level students. This session will explore our Mastery ALR Course Series curriculum, provide details of our instructional design considerations and resulting decisions, and discuss our successes and failure as well as highlight some lessons learned throughout both the design and implementation phases of the project.


Christina Glon, Emory University School of Law
Richelle Reid, Emory University School of Law

B4: From Decoder Rings to Deep Fakes: Translating Complex Technologies for Legal Education (Mt. Vernon)

“Technological developments are disrupting the practice of law” is a common refrain, but the last few years has seen some particularly complex pieces of technology become the hot new thing in legal tech. This session will look at blockchain, quantum computing, artificial intelligence, and ‘Deep Fakes’ as examples of how librarians can stay abreast of technological developments and inform themselves about their impacts in the legal profession. Then we will look at how to translate the complexities and jargon of these examples into lessons for for-credit courses, one-off informational sessions, or meetings with stakeholders.

Jason Tubinis, University of Georgia School of Law
Rachel Evans, University of Georgia School of Law

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Boxed Lunch (Crystal) 

1:00 PM - 1:45 PM Session C

C1: Copyright and Contract: New Barriers to Public Access to Legal Information (Chesapeake)

Increasingly, official sources of the law are available online. UELMA is the law of an increasing number of states. Courts are ruling in favor of citizens and activists arguing in favor of the public's right to the law. The right to access the law is more universally recognized...or is it? Are state governments in concert with commercial publishers using new tactics to restrict the public's access and use of law online? This session will focus on both the achievements of the movement to give the public access to the law as well as new setbacks. The session will end with a brainstorming session where participants will discuss ways that librarians individually as well as libraries collectively can work to ensure that the public has access to official sources of the law.

Leslie Street, Mercer University School of Law
David Hansen, Duke University

C2:  Taking the Scare out of Administrative Law Research: Creating Two Exercises That Stick (Lexington)

*Gasp!* *Blank Stare!* These are some of the student reactions to learning administrative law research. In this program, we will create two exercises, step-by-step, that take the scare out of learning administrative law. We will create an exercise that explains the rolling print schedule of the C.F.R. and an exercise that allows students to uncover administrative documents from a real news piece.

Participants, please bring a laptop or device capable of performing some basic research and document creation.  This program will be hands-on in nature, and you will leave with a useable class exercise in hand.

Cassie Rae DuBay, SMU School of Law

C3: The Law School Roaring Twenties/Great Depression:  The View from the Director's Suite on the challenges facing Law Schools and Law Libraries in the 21st Century (Deep Dive Part 1) (Stratford)

A century ago, the Roaring Twenties gave birth to the Great Depression. The world of legal education is not much different. Law schools roared up until a decade ago, but they now face challenging times with fewer students and fewer resources. To compound this, our deans focus on USNews rankings sees them funneling money to career services offices and student scholarships, often at the expense of the law library. As universities centralize more operations in the name of "efficiency," there's more bureaucracy in everything from procurement to personnel. Sharing integrated library systems subjects us to decision-making by the big boy on the block -- the main university library. And now that the ABA seems to care less and less about the library's role in the law school, some of us have to continuously justify what we do not only to our deans, but even to our faculty. This program will explore, using problem solving techniques, the daily challenges of the D suite from the experiences of the directors with a range of experiences and a variety of institutions.

Caroline Osborne, West Virginia University College of Law
Jim Heller, William & Mary Law School
Amy Wharton, University of Virginia School of Law
Marie Summerlin Hamm, Regent University School of Law
Roger Skalbeck, University of Richmond School of Law

C4: Becoming ADA Compliant: One Law Library's Role in Achieving Online Accessibility (Mt. Vernon)

Digital content provided by Louisiana State University must comply with accessibility standards under the Americans with Disabilities Act. This applies to all of LSU’s digital content, including course materials, subscription databases provided by the libraries, and the Law Center’s web site. The LSU Law Library is taking a leading role in managing the process of implementing the accessibility standards at the Law Center. Three LSU law librarians will describe their experience partnering with other Law Center and university departments to implement these standards, and to provide advice regarding how to meet the standards to other Law Center departments and faculty.

Todd Venie, LSU Law Center
Melanie Sims, LSU Law Center
Will Monroe, LSU Law Center

2:00 PM - 2:45 PM Session D

D1: Teaching a Public Patron to Fish (Chesapeake)

"Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime." How can we help our public patrons to "fish"...without giving legal advice? Benign assistance leads to follow-up questions we should avoid. How do we navigate being helpful without crossing the line? The Access to Justice movement led to some great new resources for public patrons. Our focus needs to change (thankfully) to one of marketing and outreach. How do we reach our local – and remote – communities?

Gail Mathapo, University of Florida College of Law,
Patricia Morgan, University of Florida College of Law

D2: Acting Outside the Box: Seizing Opportunities to Expand Services (Lexington)

This program involves 3-4 panelists from different types of law libraries discussing how they identified organizational needs and found innovative ways for their libraries to increase their value and visibility. Examples may include providing competitive intelligence, serving as academic advisors, and meeting new educational needs. We will also discuss how our involvement with these non-traditional services expanded our career paths.

Laura Chance, Morgan Lewis
Gwendolyn Y. Friedman, Fox Rothschild LLP
Monica Ortale, South Texas College of Law Houston
Amy Spare, Villanova University School of Law

D3: The Law School Roaring Twenties/Great Depression:  The View from the Director's Suite on the challenges facing Law Schools and Law Libraries in the 21st Century  (Deep Dive Part 2) (Stratford)

A century ago, the Roaring Twenties gave birth to the Great Depression. The world of legal education is not much different. Law schools roared up until a decade ago, but they now face challenging times with fewer students and fewer resources. To compound this, our deans focus on USNews rankings sees them funneling money to career services offices and student scholarships, often at the expense of the law library. As universities centralize more operations in the name of "efficiency," there's more bureaucracy in everything from procurement to personnel. Sharing integrated library systems subjects us to decision-making by the big boy on the block -- the main university library. And now that the ABA seems to care less and less about the library's role in the law school, some of us have to continuously justify what we do not only to our deans, but even to our faculty. This program will explore, using problem solving techniques, the daily challenges of the D suite from the experiences of the directors with a range of experiences and a variety of institutions.

Caroline Osborne, West Virginia University College of Law
Jim Heller, William & Mary Law School
Amy Wharton, University of Virginia School of Law
Marie Summerlin Hamm, Regent University School of Law
Roger Skalbeck, University of Richmond School of Law

D4: Emotional Intelligence in the Law Library (Mt. Vernon)

Emotional intelligence is the ability to recognize your own emotions and those of others and use this information to guide thinking, behavior, and interpersonal interactions. Emotional intelligence is something that can be learned and developed. There are several assessment tools available to facilitate discussions. Duke Law Library and Academic Technologies conducted voluntary sessions over several months to educate staff about the impact of emotional intelligence on performance, teamwork, and job satisfaction. This session will review the program and assess successes and opportunities for improvement a year later.

Rachel Gordon, Duke University School of Law
Casandra Laskowski, Duke University School of Law
Miguel Bordo, Duke University School of Law

2:45 PM - 3:00 PM Break (Crystal)

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM Session E

E1: Worse Than Death? Taking (Some) Fear Out of Fear of Public Speaking (Chesapeake)

Borrowing from Jerry Seinfeld, "Most people at a funeral would rather be in the casket than giving the eulogy.” So what makes pubic speaking so anxiety-ridden? You know the content, but why is it terrifying to stand up in front of a group of attorneys, students or peers and deliver an effective and engaging talk such that no one's tempted to look at their phone? If you're still searching for answers to these questions, this program will introduce basic techniques to minimize your presentation anxiety, whether simply employing the art of the pause, meaningful gestures or interjecting a good story.

Andrea Muto, Georgetown Law

E2: Creating a Resume That'll Get You Noticed (Lexington)

If it is true that “a picture is worth a thousand words,” then shouldn’t your resume be picture perfect? While often seen as an obligatory document created simply to land a job, a resume is a chance to showcase the amazing things you done in your career start a conversation with a potential employer. In this program, attendees will learn how to craft a professional resume that will grab a new employer’s attention and will discover what should and should not be included in a resume.

Bret Christensen, Charleston School of Law

E3: Creating New Opportunities: Librarians as Moot Court Coaches, Bar Exam Coaches, Workshop Instructors, and Editors (Stratford)

“Opportunities multiply as they are seized.” ~ Unknown. 
Law librarians must constantly evolve their roles to meet their users’ and institutions’ dynamic needs. This evolution can involve seeking out new opportunities that may deviate from traditional concepts of outreach. In this panel, speakers will discuss four non-traditional outreach efforts and how relatively minor initial steps (i.e. volunteering to bench a moot court team, coaching students studying for the bar exam, and co-teaching a criminal post-conviction workshop, and providing traditional citation services) can ultimately lead to greater opportunities for outreach and increased visibility and relevancy within their institutions.

Rob Beharriell, Nova Southeastern University College of Law 
Michelle Murray, Nova Southeastern University College of Law
Beth Parker, Nova Southeastern University College of Law
Alison Rosenberg, Nova Southeastern University College of Law

E4: What's Being Used? Evaluating the Collection with Quantitative and Qualitative Data (Mt. Vernon)

The primary purpose of a library is to provide access to knowledge. In the twenty-first century law library, this means providing electronic access to much of the collection, while still maintaining a print collection appropriate to patrons’ needs and use. The cost of legal publishing is increasing while legal education budgets are being cut. It is no longer sustainable for law school libraries to pay for duplicate information in print and electronic format. The question then becomes, what can or should be cut? This program will discuss methods for analyzing the law library collection for weeding and acquisitions purposes.

Lorelle Anderson, FAMU College of Law
Yolanda Jones, FAMU College of Law
Whitney Curtis, Barry University School of Law

4:00 PM - 9:00 PM Networking activities and dine-arounds 

9:00 PM S'mores Social (Sponsored by Thomson Reuters)